Brain injury patients from The Huntercombe Group showcase artwork at St Paul’s Cathedral

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The Ferocious Man by Colin
The Ferocious Man by Colin

Three patients from The Huntercombe Group have been selected to display their artwork at the ‘This is Not Me’ exhibition, at St. Paul’s Cathedral. The exhibition is a collection of paintings from the unique perspective of people with an acquired brain injury. Their art aims to portray the reality of losing their identity and the transformative process of piecing together a new self, following an acquired brain injury.

 

Lynn McLeish, Director of Specialist Brain Injury Services for The Huntercombe Group, said: “An acquired brain injury is a non-degenerative injury to the brain that has occurred since birth. Experiencing a brain injury creates many questions as people learn to come to terms with changes in their lives. For many patients, art is proven to be a beneficial form of rehabilitation.”

 

Katie Smith, Art Psychotherapist at The Huntercombe Group explains: “The focus of art therapy is not necessarily creating drawings and paintings but building a relationship between the art therapist and the patient and the underlying communication that is made possible between them as a result of the art work produced.”

 

Colin, a patient at The Huntercombe Group, says: “‘It’s hard to say how having a brain injury has changed me but my memory isn’t as good as it used to be. I don’t see myself any differently but maybe some people do. I like drawing and painting the things around me and from my imagination, and the picture in the exhibition was made after a conversation with the art therapist about self-portraits.’

 

Sponsored by The Huntercombe Group, Irwin Mitchell Solicitors, The QEF Brain Injury Centre & Raphael Medical Centre and hosted by The Acquired Brain Injury Forum for London (ABIL) and St Paul’s Cathedral, the exhibition is open from 27 January – 26 February 2015.

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